Federalist paper 70

Federalist, timeline of, federalist -Antifederalist Debates

The mutability in the public councils arising from a rapid succession of new members, however qualified they may be, points out, in the strongest manner, the necessity of some stable institution in the government. Every new election in the States is found to change one half of the representatives. From this change of men must proceed a change of opinions; and from a change of opinions, a change of measures. But a continual change even of good measures is inconsistent with every rule of prudence and every prospect of success. The remark is verified in private life, and becomes more just, as well as more important, in national transactions to trace the mischievous effects of a mutable government would fill a volume. I will hint a few only, each of which will be perceived to be a source of innumerable others. In the first place, it forfeits the respect and confidence of other nations, and all the advantages connected with national character. An individual who is observed to be inconstant to his plans, or perhaps to carry on his affairs without any plan at all, is marked at once, by all prudent people, as a speedy victim to his own unsteadiness and folly.

But a position that will not be contradicted, need stressor not be proved. All that need be remarked is, that a body which is essay to correct this infirmity ought itself to be free from it, and consequently ought to be less numerous. It ought, moreover, to possess great firmness, and consequently ought to hold its authority by a tenure of considerable duration. Another defect to be supplied by a senate lies in a want of due acquaintance with the objects and principles of legislation. It is not possible that an assembly of men called for the most part from pursuits of a private nature, continued in appointment for a short time, and led by no permanent motive to devote the intervals of public occupation to a study of the. It may be affirmed, on the best grounds, that no small share of the present embarrassments of America is to be charged on the blunders of our governments; and that these have proceeded from the heads rather than the hearts of most of the authors. What indeed are all the repealing, explaining, and amending laws, which fill and disgrace our voluminous codes, but so many monuments of deficient wisdom; so many impeachments exhibited by each succeeding against each preceding session; so many admonitions to the people, of the value. A good government implies two things: first, fidelity to the object of government, which is the happiness of the people; secondly, a knowledge of the means by which that object can be best attained. Some governments are deficient in both these qualities; most governments are deficient in the first. I scruple not to assert, that in American governments too little attention has been paid to the last. The federal Constitution avoids this error; and what merits particular notice, it provides for the last in a mode which increases the security for the first.

federalist paper 70

Federalist paper,sat rights of man, rights of man_

The number of senators, and the duration of their appointment, come next to interests be considered. In order to form an accurate judgment on both of these points, it will be proper to inquire into the purposes which are to be answered by a senate; and in order to ascertain these, it will be necessary to review the inconveniences which. It is a misfortune incident to republican government, though in a less degree than to other governments, that those who administer it may forget their obligations to their constituents, and prove unfaithful to their important trust. In this point of view, a senate, as a second branch of the legislative assembly, distinct from, and dividing the power with, a first, must be in all cases a salutary check on the government. It doubles the security to the people, by requiring the concurrence of two distinct bodies in schemes of usurpation or perfidy, where the ambition or corruption of one would otherwise be sufficient. This is a precaution founded on such clear principles, and now so well understood in the United States, that it would be more than superfluous to enlarge. I will barely remark, that as the improbability of sinister combinations will be in proportion to the dissimilarity in the genius of the two bodies, it must be politic to distinguish them from each other by every circumstance which will consist with a due harmony. The necessity of a senate is not less indicated by the propensity of all single and numerous assemblies to yield to the impulse of sudden and violent passions, and to be seduced by factious leaders into intemperate and pernicious resolutions. Examples on this subject might be cited without number; and from proceedings within the United States, as well as from the history of other nations.

federalist paper 70

Brandon comerford 101613 the federalist papers

The only option, then, for the former, lies between the proposed government and a government still more objectionable. Under this alternative, the advice of prudence must world be to embrace the lesser evil; and, instead of indulging a fruitless anticipation of the possible mischiefs which may ensue, to contemplate rather the advantageous consequences which may qualify the sacrifice. In this spirit it may be remarked, that the equal vote allowed to each State is at once a constitutional recognition of the portion of sovereignty remaining in the individual States, and an instrument for preserving that residuary sovereignty. So far the equality ought to be no less acceptable to the large than to the small States; since they are not less solicitous to guard, by every possible expedient, against an improper consolidation of the States into one simple republic. Another advantage accruing from this ingredient in the constitution of the senate is, the additional impediment it must prove against improper acts of legislation. No law or resolution can now be passed without the concurrence, first, of a majority of the people, and then, of a majority of the States. It must be acknowledged that this complicated check on legislation may in some instances be injurious as well as beneficial; and that the peculiar defense which it involves in favor of the smaller States, would be more rational, if any interests common to them, and. But as the larger States will always be able, by their power over the supplies, to defeat unreasonable exertions of this prerogative of the lesser States, and as the faculty and excess of law-making seem to be the diseases to which our governments are most.

It is equally unnecessary to dilate on the appointment of senators by the State legislatures. Among the various modes which might have been devised for constituting this branch of the government, that which has been proposed by the convention is probably the most congenial with the public opinion. It is recommended by the double advantage of favoring a select appointment, and of giving to the State governments such an agency in the formation of the federal government as must secure the authority of the former, and may form a convenient link between the. The equality of representation in the senate is another point, which, being evidently the result of compromise between the opposite pretensions of the large and the small States, does not call for much discussion. If indeed it be right, that among a people thoroughly incorporated into one nation, every district ought to have a proportional share in the government, and that among independent and sovereign States, bound together by a simple league, the parties, however unequal in size, ought. But it is superfluous to try, by the standard of theory, a part of the constitution which is allowed on all hands to be the result, not of theory, but "of a spirit of amity, and that mutual deference and concession which the peculiarity. A government founded on principles more consonant to the wishes of the larger States, is not likely to be obtained from the smaller States.

The, federalist, papers: Federalism

federalist paper 70

The, federalist, papers - congress

Text edit to the people of the State of New York: having examined the constitution of the house of Representatives, and answered such of the objections against it as seemed to merit notice, i enter next on the examination of the senate. The heads into which this member of the government may be considered are:. The qualification of senators;. The appointment of them by the State legislatures; iii. The equality of representation in the senate;.

The number of senators, and the term for essay which they are to be elected;. The powers vested in the senate. The qualifications proposed for senators, as distinguished from those of representatives, consist in a more advanced age and a longer period of citizenship. A senator must be thirty years of age at least; as a representative must be twenty-five. And morning the former must have been a citizen nine years; as seven years are required for the latter. The propriety of these distinctions is explained by the nature of the senatorial trust, which, requiring greater extent of information and stability of character, requires at the same time that the senator should have reached a period of life most likely to supply these advantages;. The term of nine years appears to be a prudent mediocrity between a total exclusion of adopted citizens, whose merits and talents may claim a share in the public confidence, and an indiscriminate and hasty admission of them, which might create a channel for foreign.

If an improper spirit of any kind should happen to prevail in it, that spirit would be apt to infuse itself into the new members, as they come forward in succession. The mass would be likely to remain nearly the same, assimilating constantly to itself its gradual accretions. There is a contagion in example which few men have sufficient force of mind to resist. I am inclined to think that treble the duration in office, with the condition of a total dissolution of the body at the same time, might be less formidable to liberty than one third of that duration subject to gradual and successive alterations. Uniformity in the time of elections seems not less requisite for executing the idea of a regular rotation in the senate, and for conveniently assembling the legislature at a stated period in each year. It may be asked, Why, then, could not a time have been fixed in the constitution?


As the most zealous adversaries of the plan of the convention in this State are, in general, not less zealous admirers of the constitution of the State, the question may be retorted, and it may be asked, Why was not a time for the like. No better answer can be given than that it was a matter which might safely be entrusted to legislative discretion; and that if a time had been appointed, it might, upon experiment, have been found less convenient than some other time. The same answer may be given to the question put on the other side. And it may be added that the supposed danger of a gradual change being merely speculative, it would have been hardly advisable upon that speculation to establish, as a fundamental point, what would deprive several States of the convenience of having the elections for their. Analysis edit This Federalist Paper is the last of three papers discussing the power of Congress over the election of its own members. 62 edit federalist. 62 is titled "The senate". This Federalist Paper was written by Alexander Hamilton or James Madison.

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And in relation to the point immediately under consideration, they ought to convince us that it is less probable that a predominant faction in a single State should, in order to maintain its superiority, incline to a preference of a particular class of electors, than. Hitherto my observations have only aimed at a vindication of the provision in question, on the ground of theoretic propriety, on that of the danger of placing the power elsewhere, and on that of the safety of placing it in the manner proposed. But there remains to be mentioned a positive advantage which will result from this disposition, and which could not as well have been obtained from any other: i allude to the circumstance of uniformity in the time of elections for the federal house of Representatives. It is more than possible that this uniformity may be found by experience to be of great importance to the public welfare, both resume as a security against the perpetuation of the same spirit in the body, and as a cure for the diseases of faction. If each State may choose its own time of election, it is possible there may be at least as many different periods as there are months in the year. The times of election in the several States, as they are now established for local purposes, vary between extremes as wide as March and november. The consequence of this diversity would be that there could never happen a total dissolution or renovation of the body at one time.

federalist paper 70

Can we imagine that the electors who reside in the remote subdivisions of the counties of Albany, saratoga, cambridge, etc., or in any part of the county of Montgomery, would take the trouble to come to the city of Albany, to give their votes for. The alarming indifference discoverable in the exercise of so invaluable a privilege under the existing laws, which afford every facility to it, furnishes a ready answer to this question. And, abstracted from any experience on the subject, we can be at no loss to determine, that when the place of election is at an inconvenient distance from the elector, the effect upon his conduct will be the same whether that distance be twenty miles. Hence it must appear, that objections to the particular modification of the federal power of regulating elections will, in substance, apply with equal essay force to the modification of the like power in the constitution of this State; and for this reason it will be impossible. A similar comparison would lead to the same conclusion in respect to the constitutions of most of the other States. If it should be said that defects in the State constitutions furnish no apology for those which are to be found in the plan proposed, i answer, that as the former have never been thought chargeable with inattention to the security of liberty, where the. To those who are disposed to consider, as innocent omissions in the State constitutions, what they regard as unpardonable blemishes in the plan of the convention, nothing can be said; or at most, they can only be asked to assign some substantial reason why the. If they cannot do this, they ought at least to prove to us that it is easier to subvert the liberties of three millions of people, with the advantage of local governments to head their opposition, than of two hundred thousand people who are destitute.

undesirable. But it would, in fact, have afforded little or no additional security against the danger apprehended; and the want of it will never be considered, by an impartial and judicious examiner, as a serious, still less as an insuperable, objection to the plan. The different views taken of the subject in the two preceding papers must be sufficient to satisfy all dispassionate and discerning men, that if the public liberty should ever be the victim of the ambition of the national rulers, the power under examination, at least. If those who are inclined to consult their jealousy only, would exercise it in a careful inspection of the several State constitutions, they would find little less room for disquietude and alarm, from the latitude which most of them allow in respect to elections, than. A review of their situation, in this particular, would tend greatly to remove any ill impressions which may remain in regard to this matter. But as that view would lead into long and tedious details, i shall content myself with the single example of the State in which I write. The constitution of New York makes no other provision for locality of elections, than that the members of the Assembly shall be elected in the counties; those of the senate, in the great districts into which the State is or may be divided: these. It may readily be perceived that it would not be more difficult to the legislature of New York to defeat the suffrages of the citizens of New York, by confining elections to particular places, than for the legislature of the United States to defeat the. Suppose, for instance, the city of Albany was to be appointed the sole place of election for the county and district of which it is a part, would not the inhabitants of that city speedily become the only electors of the members both of the.

The powers of evernote the senate, john jay 65, the powers of the senate continued, alexander Hamilton 66, objections to the power of the senate to set as a court for Impeachments Further Considered. Alexander Hamilton 67, the Executive department, alexander Hamilton 68, the mode of Electing the President. Alexander Hamilton 69, the real Character of the Executive. Alexander Hamilton 70, the Executive department Further Considered, alexander Hamilton. 61 edit federalist. 61 is titled "The same subject Continued: Concerning the power of Congress to regulate the Election of Members". This Federalist Paper was written by Alexander Hamilton. Text edit to the people of the State of New York: the more candid opposers of the provision respecting elections, contained in the plan of the convention, when pressed in argument, will sometimes concede the propriety of that provision; with this qualification, however, that.

Timeline of the, federalist -Antifederalist Debate

This subpage of, federalist Papers improve contains the text. 61-70 of the federalist Papers. For more information on the federalist Papers, see the main page on the subject. The information on this page comes from. The library of Congress website. Federalist Papers:, the federalist Papers in this page are: Title author 61, the same subject Continued: Concerning the power of Congress to regulate the Election of Members. Alexander Hamilton 62, the senate, alexander Hamilton or James Madison 63, the senate continued, alexander Hamilton or James Madison.


federalist paper 70
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5 Comment

  1. These supporters grew into the. Federalist, party committed to a fiscally sound and nationalistic government.subsidized the. Federalist editors, wrote for their papers, and in 1801 established his own paper.

  2. Federalist, papers was to gain popular support for the then-proposed Constitution. The democratic-Republicans nominated New York s governor Clinton to replace. Federalist, john Adams as vice president, but Adams won. Federalist era debate on the corporation was much broader than how shareholders would treat with one another.

  3. 72: The debate over How to Elect the President. The United States has produced three historic documents of major importance: the declaration of Independence, the constitution, and The. The entire purpose of The.

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  5. For more information on the, federalist, papers, see the main page on the subject. 62 is titled The senate. Federalist, paper was written by Alexander Hamilton or James Madison. Federalist, papers: Brutus.

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